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College Applications

At Home TJ Math Drills

When clients call for advice to get into TJ, the first thing I do is have them take a one hour at-home math test to see how strong the student’s problem solving skills are.  My test is extremely predictive: a poor score means acceptance to TJ is nil unless the student takes action to improve basic math skills.

To address the deficit, we conduct math drills for 7th graders on Tuesday evenings during the spring and summer.  The students come in, sit for a timed 25 question test, and then we review the problems that gave them difficulty.  This is an excellent method for improving math test taking skills and over the years it has made a dramatic difference, in conjunction with our comprehensive TJ prep class and SIS workshop, in enhancing their admissions outcomes.

Unfortunately hurdles abound for parents trying to get to our drill classes.

> I can’t get there on a weekday evening.
> It is too far.
> There is too much traffic.
> I’m too busy.
> The drill class is at dinner time.
> She has sports conflicts.
> He has a test.
> He has after school activities.

Fortunately we are working on a solution.  We have started math drills at home project and have launched our first drill.

We have four drills scheduled so far.

Drill #1 average difficulty
Drill #2 higher difficulty – recommended if you did well on drill #1
Drill #3 average difficult – recommended if you did poorly on drill #1
Drill #4 higher difficulty – recommended if you did poorly on drill #2

We will continue making drills if there is a demand for the videos.

To find out more, click here.

2019-05-04T16:28:40-04:00

Upcoming Presentations

LearningRx – A New Approach to Old Problems

Thursday, May 9, 2019 at 7:30pm

Recently, I met with Maureen Loftus, Executive Director, of LearningRx of Vienna and Reston. What an exciting meeting! I am astounded by what this brain training method can do.

She recounted situation after situation in which students have been able to train their brain to create new pathways and connections to learn previously challenging academic studies. (more…)

2019-10-12T19:16:19-04:00

Just Be Yourself

“Just be yourself” – arguably the most cliché, most useless, and most frustrating piece of “advice” handed out on a day-to-day basis. But if it’s so useless, why do we hear it constantly when setting out for first dates, readying for interviews, or sitting down to start that all-important college essay?

A majority of college applicants know that the amount of time a reviewer spends poring over college applications is infinitesimal, so why bother? Regardless of the impressive awards you’ve spent your high school career amassing, to the person reviewing your file, you’re nothing more than a slip of paper – that is, until you differentiate yourself.

But is there such a thing as going too far – sure, every great joke can be ruined with poor delivery, but can every terrible joke be redeemed with a hilarious rendition? Are there experiences that are just so flat out boring and unimportant that, even with the proper storytelling, fall flat in a college essay setting?

My freshman year of high school, an admissions officer came to our school to do a presentation on how to write a college essay. After some basic tips and what to include, he ended the presentation by reading a few examples of his favorite essays. While I can’t recall the exact topics of the first two essays he read, they were wonderfully written and both told compelling stories. The third one, which left a permanent imprint on my mind, was about a three-year-old boy on a quest for his lost shoe. Despite the ridiculous pretense, I was hooked. By the time the lector was finished, the child-like and colorful layers of the essay had fallen away to reveal a surprisingly deep message. Not only did the essay demonstrate the applicant’s eagerness to explore and problem-solve, but its novelty and presentation kept me entertained. It was simultaneously the most fun and most meaningful essay I had heard in my life.

The college essay is the chance to show to the college admissions officer not only that you’ve done the preparation for college, but also how it has impacted you as a person and how you’ve grown and benefitted from having that experience. The college essay is an opportunity to tell that story from a personal lens. For example, loads of people have been skydiving, but not everyone conquered their fear of heights and have used that experience to challenge their fears, break new ground, and etc… (you get the idea). Even though people may experience similar circumstances, the way that they approach the situation and what they take away makes them stand out – and that’s exactly what the college officers want to see.

2018-08-01T19:05:10-04:00

Tell Us What We Can Do Better – College Admissions Seminar Cancellation

We at Inspiring Test Preparation recently had to cancel our College Admissions Seminar with Cathy Ganley of ForWord Consulting.

All of us here want to continue to make our business better and more accessible to students and parents, and you can help us. We would love to hear your opinion on why this class couldn’t work for you, and what we can do going forward in order to continue serving our clients the best way we can.

Included at the end of this post is a short survey. Let us know what you think!

2018-03-22T00:29:40-04:00